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What's lost and what's gained in Destiny 2's excellent PC version


Having pumped hundreds of hours into Destiny 1 and 2 on console, giving the PC version a shot was an initially bewildering experience. After three years using a rumbling controller to shoot aliens at 30 frames a second, switching to WASD and a click of a mouse button initially felt like playing with one hand tied behind my back. But as I got used to the mouse and keyboard control scheme, Destiny 2’s excellent PC version began to shine – and taught me a few things about the console version I took for granted.

Bungie games have always felt – to me at least – built for controllers. Destiny and now Destiny 2 is the best-feeling shooter around, with silky smooth controls, sickly sweet character movement and a satisfying aim assist honed through a decade of Halo development. Moving to PC, it’s clear Bungie took translating this Destiny feel to mouse and keyboard seriously, even if it trades accuracy for a dash of the Bungie magic.

After rolling a new Titan I quickly found I was more accurate on PC. Using a mouse for shooting makes hand cannons in particular a more effective weapon than they are on console, especially in the player versus player mode, The Crucible. Yes, there’s recoil, and Bungie has faithfully recreated the ‘time to aim down sights’ on all the various weapon types, but there’s no aim assist. You are in complete control of aiming, and with the extra reticule speed granted by a mouse, popping heads is an easier affair.

So is turning. Turning your character as fast as your mouse will let you is a revelation for the Destiny experience. This helps for when enemy players get the jump on you, or enemy aliens ambush you from behind. The speed and accuracy of aiming combined with your ability to 180 in the blink of an eye makes you feel more deadly on PC than on console, so much so that I find The Crucible a more enjoyable – and satisfying – experience on PC.